Emotional: The cast of Emmerdale shed real tears as they filmed scenes in which Marlon Dingle, played by Mark Charnock, struggled to go to his bride Rhona Goskirk (Marlon pictured in a wheelchair).

The cast of Emmerdale shed real tears as Marlon Dingle, who was suffering from a stroke, struggled to go to his bride Rhona

The cast of Emmerdale shed real tears as they filmed scenes of Marlon Dingle struggling to walk down the aisle to meet his bride, Rhona Goskirk.

Woolpack chef Marlon, played by actor Mark Charnock, 53, suffered a terrible stroke earlier this year and struggled to get up to say his vows and marriage to Rhona (Zoë Henry).

According to Mirror, Zoë, 48, said: “We were in tears. It was brilliantly written and emotions came naturally to both of us when needed.

Emotional: The cast of Emmerdale shed real tears as they filmed scenes in which Marlon Dingle, played by Mark Charnock, struggled to go to his bride Rhona Goskirk (Marlon pictured in a wheelchair).

“The plot was such a difficult observation. But the wedding shows the light.

“Stroke affects a lot of people, including my family, so it’s important that we see the light. That’s what people need. Soap reflects real life, but it also has to bring a little bit of joy.”

Mark said he found the scenes, which will air next Thursday, difficult to film and described the scenes as “relentlessly moving”.

Heartbreaking: Woolpack chef Marlon suffered a terrible stroke earlier this year and he struggled to get up to say his vows and his marriage to Rhona, played by Zoë Henry (pictured)

Heartbreaking: Woolpack chef Marlon suffered a terrible stroke earlier this year and he struggled to get up to say his vows and his marriage to Rhona, played by Zoë Henry (pictured)

Viewers were brought to tears in March when they saw the realistic portrayal of Marlon suffering a stroke.

Marlon was seen being picked up by paramedics after experiencing the life-threatening medical condition, with the long-lasting effects that would potentially change his life forever.

Marlon was spotted rummaging around his house for an engagement ring as he prepared to propose to Rhona.

Hart: Mark said he found the scenes - which will air next Thursday - difficult to film and described the scenes as

Hart: Mark said he found the scenes – which will air next Thursday – difficult to film and described the scenes as “relentlessly moving”.

Feeling uncomfortable, he looked in the mirror and saw his face begin to contort, leaving him terrified.

He soon collapsed and was found by his daughter, April Windsor (Amelia Flanagan), who was looking for him and called an ambulance after realizing what had happened.

Mark previously said he finds researching the serious and life-threatening disease “a total eye-opener” and sees the storyline as “a tremendous responsibility.”

Shock: It comes after Emmerdale viewers were moved to tears in March after watching actor Mark's realistic portrayal of his character Marlon suffer a horrific stroke

Shock: It comes after Emmerdale viewers were moved to tears in March after watching actor Mark’s realistic portrayal of his character Marlon suffer a horrific stroke

He said: “Collaborating with the research team at Emmerdale and The Stroke Association on this story was eye opening.”

“We often hear the word stroke, but just being confronted with the sheer mass of numbers in this country alone was a shock.

“It is a tremendous responsibility to try to make things right for the survivors and their families and for those who have lost loved ones to this horrific event.”

The Stroke Association has worked closely with the soap and believes audiences “can relate” to the effects of the brain attack induced by cutting off blood in your brain.

Juliet Bouverie, chief executive of the charity, said: “Many viewers will relate to Marlon’s storyline, including the UK’s 1.3 million stroke survivors.”

In a video shared online after the episode, Mark spoke about what to do when someone is having a stroke.

Seriously: The 53-year-old actor, who plays the Woolpack chef on the ITV soap, was seen being taken down by paramedics after experiencing the life-threatening condition

Seriously: The 53-year-old actor, who plays the Woolpack chef on the ITV soap, was seen being taken down by paramedics after experiencing the life-threatening condition

He said: “Statistics show that someone in the UK suffers a stroke every five minutes and it is the fourth leading cause of death in the country at 35,000 a year.

“In tonight’s episode we saw Marlon having a stroke. Strokes can strike anyone, at any age, at any time. And they happen every five minutes in the UK.

“50 percent of stroke survivors depend on others for their daily needs. And unfortunately, every seventh stroke is fatal.

Honest: Mark previously said he finds research into the serious and life-threatening condition

Honest: Mark previously said he finds research into the serious and life-threatening condition “a total eye-opener” and sees the storyline as “a tremendous responsibility”

“Hopefully there’s some really important information we can glean from Marlon’s story.

“The most important of these is the acronym FAST, and we can use it to identify symptoms of a stroke in you or someone else.

‘F stands for facial weakness. Can the person smile? Is her smile crooked? Did her eye or her mouth fall off?

Medical assistance: Marlon was helped by paramedics after his daughter called for help when she was worried he would be missing for a while

Medical assistance: Marlon was helped by paramedics after his daughter called for help when she was worried he would be missing for a while

“A stands for arm weakness. Can the person raise both arms? Do you have a weakness on one side?

‘S is for language problems. Can the person make themselves understood? Do they slander their words? can they understand you

“And most important of all, T, and it’s time to call 999 if you see any or all of these symptoms in a person or in yourself.

He continued, “It’s really important for us to understand this acronym so we can recognize the possibility that someone is having a stroke, because the quicker that person can be taken to the hospital and treated, the better their chances of recovery and.” chances of survival .

“Emmerdale worked on this story with some amazing people, including the Stroke Association, clinicians and survivors, people who actually went through it.”

If you think you or someone you know is having a stroke, act FAST as stroke is a medical emergency and call 999

Think “FAST” and look for: F stands for Face Weakness, A stands for Arm Weakness, S stands for Speech Difficulties, and T stands for Time To Call 999

In a non-emergency setting, support is available to anyone affected by stroke, including family, friends and carers, via the Stroke Association on 0303 3033 100, helpline@stroke.org.uk or visit www.stroke.org.uk

Emmerdale continues Tuesday at 7.30pm on ITV1.

THE CAUSES OF THE BLOW

There are two main types of stroke:

1. ISCHEMIC STROKE

An ischemic stroke — which accounts for 80 percent of strokes — occurs when a blood vessel that prevents blood from reaching a part of the brain becomes blocked.

2. Hemorrhagic stroke

The less common, a hemorrhagic stroke, occurs when a blood vessel ruptures and floods part of the brain with too much blood while depriving other areas of adequate blood supply.

It can be the result of an AVM, or an arteriovenous malformation (an abnormal collection of blood vessels) in the brain.

Thirty percent of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage die before reaching the hospital. Another 25 percent die within 24 hours. And 40 percent of those who survive die within a week.

RISK FACTORS

Age, high blood pressure, smoking, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, diabetes, atrial fibrillation, family history and history of a previous stroke or TIA (a mini-stroke) are risk factors for stroke.

SYMPTOMS OF A STROKE

  • Sudden number or weakness of the face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of the body
  • Sudden confusion, difficulty speaking or understanding
  • Sudden visual disturbances or blurred vision in one or both eyes
  • Sudden difficulty walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause

RESULTS

Of the approximately three out of four people who survive a stroke, many will have lifelong disabilities.

These include difficulty walking, communicating, eating, and doing everyday tasks or chores.

TREATMENT

Both are potentially fatal, and patients must be operated on within three hours or put on a drug called tPA (Tissue Plasminogen Activator) to save them.

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